Let's talk about cardboard Christmas houses and accessories

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2012 2:45 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2011 11:05 am
Posts: 447
This is what I call the Orange Bay Window House. Some of you have seen these photos before but it is of a house and type that
I uncovered last year. As a type these houses all have an extended piece of cardboard
on the bottom of the platform base and it projects about 1/8" of an inch all
around. Further these all seem to have square posts with caps all made of
folded and glued cardboard. None of them have gold mullioned windows and
are usually smaller just red cellophane windows but not always all that
small but never the mullioned windows of any kind. Point 3 these house all
have an interior floor. This is sometimes hard to determine without
removing the house from the base but this strange feature is exhibited in
all of them.
The following house is very closely related to the gloss top
houses and has orange lacquei on the house part with NO mica or glitter at
all and is glossy. The roof is green lacquei and has glass glitter all over
it, and the base is light blue and has fine glass glitter over all. This
glitter is Very SMALL and unlike anything available today or even on later
houses made in Japan in the thirties.
So in sum this group of houses is different and likely made by the same
small maker. They have 1.) extended or flanged bases. 2.) Square folded
and capped cardboard posts. 3.) interior floors in the buildings separate
from the base and attached to the house part. (and ceilings in a couple of
instances.) 4.) The use of laquie somewhere on the building. In addition
some have a very ODD plaster like snow paint though this orange house does
not.
The orange house in addition to the above that make up the "TYPE" has bay
windows and some sort of odd removable roof detail that I have attempted to
recreate. What it likely was was a bird house type steeple but this is no
church. And a chimney proved to be to big. This type of cupola can be seen
in some of the generalized views in the lacquie section of papatedsplace.
Here are the Photos. The colors of Orange & Green are so Early thirties!
Commentary is appreciated and the HOM was one of my favorite features of
Ted's site.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2012 1:28 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 16, 2011 7:32 pm
Posts: 1883
I hope one day to be able to duplicate that fence.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 1:42 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2011 7:59 pm
Posts: 128
Location: Long Beach, CA
This is really nice, Tom. Like Maria, I would like to be able to duplicate the fence. Can you tell me what the material is? What looks like a supporting inner fence is a new feature to me.
The dormer roof appears to be of thicker cardboard. Is that consistent throughout this house?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 10:00 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2012 8:30 pm
Posts: 196
I had success duplicating that type of fence using the following method: I cut an approximately 1 - 1/2" tall by 12" long strip of FLIMSY cardboard (not real stiff...you'll see why) and then wrapped flat raffia around and around, doubling and even tripling over all the way down the strip, until the cardboard was no longer visible = but without the "fence" being too fat. Then, I put the whole business on my sewing machine and stitched a double line of the largest stitch setting I had down the middle of the length of the strip. (Kind of rough on the needle but if you use a flimsy cardboard it will go right through.) After stitching through, I used a pair of scissors and cut the loops of raffia on what would be the top and bottom edges of the fence and then ruffled the raffia with my fingers so that it was not so perfect. You can pull or snip the the cardboard away up to nearly the stitch line after the raffia is stitched, or just leave it in place. I think I was able to buy a big ball of flat raffia at Michaels, or some such craft store, for not much money. Then you can just cut the length of fence that you need and glue it to a firmer, supporting cardboard fence.

It's kind of late and I'm kind of tired, so if this explanation is not clear I can provide pix to anyone who might be interested.

I've used this method numerous times and it's a ringer for the real thing.

Barb


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 12:03 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 02, 2011 4:27 pm
Posts: 1554
Barb, thanks for the tip.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 7:41 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2011 11:05 am
Posts: 447
Well Nan I think Barb's idea will work just GREAT! But what it was was - TISSUE PAPER! What else! After all the Japanese were masters of all kind of paper. The making of and manipulate of paper has been long considered a high art in Japan and the culture is rife with examples on their love of paper. What they did was to sort of curl up the paper into little post like things and then sew the bottom edge. I had a piece of fence laying around that was just a remnant that was in very bad condition and the sewing had come unravelled. So I wet the paper and slowly unwrapped it just to see what it was. However I never could figure out how to do it myself. But those cwazy Japanese had no trouble - evidently. My personal opinion was that this was to replicate an indigenous type of Japanese fence made of bamboo. I saw fences like this made of small diameter bamboo about an inch and they were bound together with something like twine. Probably designed to keep critters out of their gardens. Some houses had the entire parameter of the lot fenced with this stuff. This was in the more rural areas around Yokosuka. Tom


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2012 9:13 pm 
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Wow what a great idea you came up with! Pictures would be wonderful and greatly appreciated!!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 7:31 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2011 7:59 pm
Posts: 128
Location: Long Beach, CA
Great information, Barb and Tom. Now that my sewing machine is back in operating order, I am looking forward to trying your wonderfully pragmatic suggestion, Barb (and hope it remains in operating condition--I'll pick up some heavy-duty needles). Tom, my compliments to your empirical mind--going to the source and unraveling (no pun intended) the answer. Those bamboo fences are still available in southern California, at least, by the foot or yard, but instead of twine they're bound with wire. Wonderfully flexible for a lot of uses.
I'm looking forward to seeing photos.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2012 10:20 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2012 8:30 pm
Posts: 196
OK since there seems to be some interest I am attaching some pix of my fence technique. By the way, I was at Michael's today and found the raffia in all sorts of fun colors as well as the basic beige, including a nice green that is kind of like the originals you occasionally find. Looks like I need to submit pix in groups of 3, and the order is a bit odd so I labeled them Step 1, Step 2, etc. etc. Happy stitching! Barb


Attachments:
File comment: Step 3
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File comment: Step 2
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File comment: Step 1
tomfence2.jpg
tomfence2.jpg [ 44.3 KiB | Viewed 15750 times ]
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2012 10:22 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2012 8:30 pm
Posts: 196
More steps and pix....


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File comment: Step 6
tomfence10.jpg
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File comment: Step 5
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File comment: Step 4
tomfence6.jpg
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Note: To ask a question, sign up for our "Christmas Times" newsletter, or learn how
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Note: All content on this forum is Copyright (c) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 by Paul D. Race
and by the posters who have contributed specific content. All material is for your personal use only. No content
or plans may be republished or sold, nor may any plans be used to make products to sell without prior written
permission from Paul D. Race and the individual who contributed the content or plan in question.
For permissions or for questions about this policy, please contact us using our Contact page.



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